Episode 45

The Video Game of Life
with Jules Porter

Few people in life truly get to follow their dreams – self-limiting beliefs, circumstances, or a choice – we’re good at keeping ourselves in a lane. Jules isn’t one of those people.
 
From time in the service to education galore, Jules set out on a mission to be her best self, and now she’s making waves. If you’re lacking inspiration in your life, this episode will provide it.
 
Oh, and you may just want to tune in to hear about how Jules will very likely be the first black woman to release a video game on a major platform. Mind blown.
 
Available NOW wherever you get your podcast!

Jules’ Book Recommendations

“Mama” by Terry McMillan

Jules’ Bio

Jules is a lawyer who makes video games. She is a proud military veteran with a J.D. and MBA from the University of St. Thomas, a B.S. in Aeronautics from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, and a seminary theology degree holder. She is the founder of Seraph 7 Studios, the first Black woman-owned console video game development company. Her company features games with diverse heroes and storylines and a STE[A]M work-study program for local students. She is committed to community empowerment and service and is a frequent volunteer speaker at local schools where she speaks to students about various legal, government, business, and STE[A]M topics.  

Ms. Porter also serves on the St. Thomas School of Law Alumni Board and on the board of the Minnesota Association of Black Lawyers. Most recently, Jules was named as one of Minnesota’s Top 20 technopreneurs, was one of MEDA’s 2021 Million Dollar Challenge winners, and she was among the International Leadership Institute’s 2020 honorees for her positive portrayal of BIPOC characters in her video games. In her spare time, Jules enjoys thriller and sci-fi movies, books on astrobiology and afro-futurism, and she cheers on the Minnesota Vikings.

Connect with Jules:

LinkedIn

Instagram

Twitter

Pinterest

Facebook

 

Subscribe Now

Subscribe on iTunes

Subscribe on Google Podcasts

Subscribe on Spotify

Subscribe on iTunesPodchaser

Episode Transcript

Angie 

Welcome to the No More Mondays podcast, the show that inspires confident professionals by interviewing people who actually enjoy what they do for work. I’m your host, Angie Callen, and I welcome you to join me each week, as I chat with founders, entrepreneurs and employees who have figured out that special sauce, the magic, the mystery to having no more Mondays. Hey there listeners and welcome to another edition of the No More Mondays podcast. As always, I’m super excited. You decided to join us for this episode called The Video Game of Life. I am not sure where to even begin with Jules Porter. She’s an attorney, she’s got an MBA, she’s a theologist. She’s a Marine Corps veteran. Pick the label that resonates most with you because she’s got them all and more. Jules clearly has a passion for learning and education, which she’s now supporting directly through her own video game company. Seraph 7 Studios focuses on the gamification of STEAM work study programs, through diverse heroes and storylines. And as a former female engineer, it definitely resonates with me. And this whole effort even helped Jules get onto Minnesota’s list of top 20 technopreneurs. I couldn’t be more excited to dig into everything that she’s got going on both in the video game industry and more, and from career transitions to entrepreneurship, and more letters behind her name than the alphabet. We’re going to just go ahead and dive in and give a warm welcome to Jules Porter. Jules, welcome to No More Mondays!

 

Jules 

Thank you so much for having me.

 

Angie 

I’m excited, I’m excited to get to know more. And I know that they’re really going to kind of fascinate and inspire our listeners. So, let’s start with Seraph 7 Studios, tell that say that three times fast, by the way. So, tell everybody a little bit more of how this came to life and kind of the work you’re doing there.

 

Jules 

So, I really saw Seraph 7 as just a natural progression of one being a Marine Corps veteran, and still having this passion for really serving the community and serving the nation, to just being the St. Thomas law student caring about social justice at a time when you know, here in Minnesota, we had just had the killings of Jamar Clark and Philando Castille at that time. And of course, Justine Damond, and then three, really just at St. Thomas, we also had this kind of spiritual, I guess, journey. What do you call those things? When you kind of go out retreat? Yes, a spiritual journey retreat. And we really talked about finding our callings and how we can identify, you know, what our natural skills and talents are? What are the things in our life that really motivates us that we’re really passionate about, and that we’re just naturally good at? And then looking at the community? What does our community really need from us that we can give? And how can we use those skills and talents in order to meet the needs of our community? You know, and then once you kind of find that synergy, and you move forward, you know, do you have this natural momentum behind it? does it inspire other people as well. And I believe that I found that not only do I believe that the law is my calling, but also this kind of creative use, and creative ideas behind social justice is another thing that I feel is a huge part of my calling. I think for so long, we’ve been chanting the same chance at protests for the same reasons for generations. And I think it’s, it’s really time to try new ways at serving the community and really uplifting everyone. When I was a kid, I remember Senator Paul Wellstone, and he gave this really great quote that always stuck with me it was “when you lift from the bottom, everybody rises.” And so, my goal is how can I just help everybody rise? And how can I help some parts of our nation really heal, and come to a better understanding of one another?

 

Angie 

There’s so many little things here that we’re gonna end up coming back to, and just specific pieces I like to kind of, you know, touch on here. I’ll go back to the fact that you said something that I also kind of believe to be true is that, like, law doesn’t necessarily invoke change, if anything, maybe it does exactly the opposite. And you’ve kind of found a way to work around that. And you’ve given us bits and pieces of kind of like how you got to this point, but I mean, you studied aero- you were in the Marine Corps. You studied aeronautics, you have a theology degree, like, how does this all come together? As far as like the backstory of really even just how you got to practice the practice of law and found that first, kind of, I’m gonna say passion that really lined everything else lined up behind? How’d you get here?

 

Jules 

Well, when I got when I was a kid, well, well, first of all my parents, they both went to HBCU. So, those are historical black colleges and university and my mom was a principal. And when I went to school, I grew up here in Minnesota, but we didn’t learn a lot of black history or things like that. So, my mom gave us additional Black History homework, right? It’s so even though in a lot of the things that I was learning and the video games I was playing in the books that I was, you know, reading for school, there weren’t a lot of black figures in those books. Thanks to my parents, I was learning about all these phenomenal black heroes all the time. And one who really stuck out to me, especially in 1993, when she went up to outer space was Dr. Mae Jamison. And I was like, whoa, black woman can go to outer space, we can be astronauts. Yes, it opened up this whole new world. And I mean, that’s why I really wanted to go in aeronautics. I wanted to work for NASA and be it become an astronaut as well. It’s so well that didn’t happen. I’m still able to bring my love for just outerspace for exploring the unknown, for doing something that’s never been done into video gaming. So, instead of maybe going up in the space and exploring worlds, which I hope Elon Musk listens to your podcast, so I can get up there one day, but I can create awesome universes and awesome worlds in this game space.

 

Angie 

We’re totally gonna tag Elon Musk up because I think that’s the only way he’s ever gonna listen to nowhere Mondays, but I love this idea. I actually feel like it’s really interesting, like how full circle things come or just how things that happen in our childhood really created an influence that could that can seem inconsequential, but can be so significant of this idea that you had this hero, and now you’re creating heroes via video games for others.

 

Jules 

Absolutely. You know, because as I kind of mentioned that there weren’t really any video game characters, I look like me. I mean, we had Princess Peach, right? Who’s Well, Princess Toadstool back then. So, that was like the first female video game character that I got to play as in sort of the only one for a little bit of time. But it’s really important, because now here it is 2021. And I like to play video games with my nephew, and my nephew is now 13 years old. But I realized a few years back that man, there weren’t games that I could pick up to play with my nephew, where he could see himself as a hero, or even just a positive character. In the games that we were playing the way black people were depicted in video games, especially black men, or gangsters, mobsters, drug dealers, black women as prostitutes. It was our I should say it is horrible, right. And that just hasn’t been my experience of what being black is. And there are so many awesome black heroes out there people who did great stuff whose stories have just never been told, in the gaming space, or, you know, even a similar story told in the gaming space about black folks. And it’s really time to change that, you know, because what you have is you basically have a world where now, not only do black kids not see themselves as heroes in the games that they’re playing. But people outside of our community where media is so important for how they come to understand that the black community are also not playing games, or not seeing black people in positive roles, or as heroes in these games. Now, they’re not like Pong back in the day. I mean, these are like immersive virtual experience. It’s like playing an interactive movie, or the games last 60 to 100 hours. So, that’s 60 to 100 hours, we’re negative stereotypes of black folks are being reinforced. And that’s not even to get into the way women are portrayed in gaming, super hyper sexualized. And just so inappropriate, and so unrealistic. And half of the video game industry about 46 to 40% are women who are playing these games, and I think it’s also a missed opportunity to not give us more various roles of women in gaming, because we’re all so different. 

 

Angie 

Well, and I was exactly thinking of like, okay, princess told Stutes Toadstool, you and I are probably about the same age and she was almost more of a damsel in distress than she was a heroine which totally perpetuates that idea of like, where do women fall in these narratives? And it’s really about kind of changing the narratives and I have to tell you, have you read the book Ready Player One? I haven’t, but I did see okay, so I feel like I we listed we just recently went I’m just kind of totally squirrel for a minute, Joel’s we went on a road trip recently and listened to it as an audiobook. And we’ll, we’ll wait in there. It’s and it’s awesome. It’s worth it. But we’re talking about, like so much nostalgia. And there’s a significant female character in that book that I feel like all this totally jives with just this idea of like turning the tides in a very innocent, very otherwise kind of like, set landscape as far as like tone and involvement and diversity. And yeah, I’m curious from a career perspective, like how does all this fit together? So, is there a seven year full time job and that’s where you practice law? Is it kind of like a side project and you have another job? I’m curious from like a logistics perspective, how all of these things fit together in a day to day?

 

Jules 

Well, initially, I was doing both. I was both a lawyer. I work as a staff attorney for a judge. And I was working on my video game at the same time and that was a lot and I was realizing that it was more and more difficult to get eight hours of sleep a night.

 

Angie 

Beside the side hustle like can only be a side hustle for so long.

 

Jules  

Exactly. And the innovation lab that was started by Finnegan’s Brewery and the Bush Foundation, they actually had a internship or a fellowship called the Innovation Fellowship. And I apply for it. And I was awarded one of the fellowships for the second cohort of fellows. And that was amazing. So, that came with basically office space. It came with $50,000, for living expenses, which allowed me to put my legal career on pause, and to choose to use that nine months to focus fully on my company and developing the game. And that was really, I think, the game changer for me.

 

Angie 

I was gonna ask you, logistically how you made that transition? Because there’s a lot of listeners out there who are curious about that, like, how do I transition into kind of like an entrepreneurial endeavor, you know, without putting everything at risk? And you you found a very, very intelligent, risk averse way to do it. And that was by tapping into resources around you that can help you bridge the gap.

 

Jules 

Absolutely. And lawyers are very risk averse. So, you said the right terminology, yes, but not post fantastic, because at that point, right, I had a big legal community, and just mentors and network. It’s sort of in business, I was sort of growing one in the traditional business sense. But I wasn’t really tapped into the Entrepreneurship Network. And so, the Innovation Fellowship also helped me greatly with that, getting mentors and just getting to know more colleagues in the space. And it was fantastic. 

 

Angie 

So, you’re like a half step ahead of me, because mentorship was the next was the next topic I wanted to shift into. And you just brought it up and set me up so perfectly, because one of the things were really high that I’ve decided I want to highlight on this season of the No More Mondays podcast is mentorship and how it’s really impacted us. So, it’s definitely aligned with what you’re doing it serve seven, but I’d love to know how it shaped your career, whether it was in that kind of incubator setting or earlier on in life.

 

Jules 

Yeah, and I actually have to go back to St. Thomas against at St. Thomas, the law school, every law student has a mentor. And there’s kind of a supported mentorship program. That was awesome. And so, each year since I was so new to the profession, and I didn’t know lawyers before law school, I asked for two mentors. And the people who were my mentors, all throughout law school are still my mentors, today, I was able to develop such a great relationship. And there’s some of my biggest cheerleaders. And I forgot to mention before, but I am still active in the legal community, even though I am working full time on my game. So, I do a lot of volunteer stuff. I’m on the board of the Minnesota Association of Black lawyers. And that’s just been totally fulfilling. But no, my mentors were actually some of the first people I went to about my video game idea, once my fellow students kind of uplifted me a bit, and they loved it. They are, they’re the people who, when I get ready to pitch at a big competition or before investor, you know, they take the time out of their day to listen to my pitch to help me shape it up to ask me the questions that run through their mind so that I can refine things. So my mentors have just been absolutely phenomenal. That’s awesome.

 

Angie 

And I’m curious, as far as the video game piece goes, it’s such a unique avenue and media. Where do you find it resonating when you are kind of pitching who’s using it and who’s taking advantage of it?

 

Jules 

Well, what I found is, you know, initially, I thought I would need to put more of a video game spin on the pitch. But what I learned, especially through the the fellowship program was that my first backers, and my first supporters are people who really care about the social impact of my company. So, you kind of mentioned that before, but in addition to making video games, so when my game come out comes out, it looks like I will be the first black woman to launch a video game on Play Station, Xbox and Nintendo. But in addition to that, I know it’s exciting. In addition to that, we teach high school students in 10th,11th, and 12th grades a three year program, how to do the same how to develop video games with the goal of having the students be career ready upon graduation only for career in video games, but also just for a career in STEM or tech, or wherever they would like to go in that space and really uplift them and their economic potential. So that’s, that really resonates with the people that I that I talk with. So I really lean on changing Well, I guess combating racism and sexism in a unique way, but also giving kids the skills that they need to really be competitive in this new landscape. 

 

Angie 

And it’s obviously a trending, it’s growing. It’s a growing field technology as a whole. And there needs to be more like represent there needs to be more representation in it. And this idea of gamification is very trending across kind of like all facets, whether it’s quite literally video games, or even like gamification of marketing, or online learning, or whatever it is, so you’re kind of like, definitely operating at the sweet spot. And we’re gonna celebrate big time when you get the official distinction of being the first black woman to release a mainstream video game on all the key platforms.

 

Jules 

Absolutely. And you know, part of part of my curriculum for the for the video game education piece too, is a little bit of the metaverse, so I hope to be also the first black woman to crater on metaverse. So, what it is, is I have part of the program since I want the students to not only get high school credit, but also get college credit and a certificate of completion from a college to really make their resume shine. But as part of that, I’m making a virtual reality space. So, these kids will actually go to school on this virtual reality campus. For part of the class, they’ll be able to interact with each other in this VR space, they’ll be able to develop skatepark, or they’ll be able to develop different games, it’s so it’ll be really, really dope. So, they’ll be able to put on their resume. Not only did they attend classes in VR, but they were actually able to further develop part of this VR space. And this VR campus, which I think is just going to be really, really amazing. And it also allows students with disabilities to more fully engage in the curriculum than sometimes they can an in person classroom. 

 

Angie 

Yeah, there’s a lot less distractions. And let me just I’m going to point out two things, Jules, first of all, I love even more because you just I think became the first podcast guest to use the word dope on an episode. Yes, it’s such a good throwback. And talking about this. It’s so funny that we brought up like, I brought up what a Ready Player One earlier because now we’re really talking about kind of something that like that, that book makes me makes me think of, but it’s totally right, you can support people have more access to things with the virtual world, less distractions, the the kind of sky’s the limit. And if, for those of you out there listening, I what I if there’s one thing you take away from this conversation so hard so far, it’s that really no dream is impossible, because there’s a lot of like, big disruptive paving the way stuff going on here, with just this one human who has a mission and saw potential.

 

Jules 

Absolutely, I will tell people absolutely pursue your dreams, and sometimes your dreams, manifest in ways that you didn’t even anticipate you might have thought it would come about one way and it came about a completely different way. I mean, three years ago, I wouldn’t think that here I am talking about developing, you know, a metaverse space, right for kids to go to school. And I also didn’t think before I was able to get the education team started, that this program would go from being a one year program to a three year program and really give these kids the skills that they need. I mean, I think it’s really cool that not only can I share my imagination, but I’m just one person. But I’m also now able to help inspire kids also share their imagination, their perspective, share the stories that really resonate with them. And so it’s like building an army of changemakers. And it’s just amazing. So yes, inspiration is contagious.

 

Angie 

Good point, I like the, I like that you aren’t you? Well, you have a lot of ideas. And I appreciate that, because I’m pretty sure that my husband has an automatic off switch when he hears, Hey, honey, I have an idea. But you’re not afraid to explore them and kind of test them out and see where they go. And if one doesn’t work, you move on. And I think that that’s a really important thing about what you have going on is that it’s one the awareness around what you really want to do what those passions and dreams are, and testing out what ideas are going to support it and actually make it a reality.

 

Jules 

Yeah, and it does take a it takes a lot right takes a lot of gusto, I guess you could kind of say I think it does help that my fallback career is being a lawyer, you know, that I think that’s extremely helpful. It can be a bit difficult if my fallback career was something else, or even nothing. And so, you know, stepping out, I guess, on faith, but you know, plan faith, I would say, Well, research faith. Is it sometimes scary, but necessary.

 

Angie 

It’s an educated, you’re taking educated kind of calculated risk. And you have, so I’m gonna kind of change gears, but this is all this is all very, like moving in the in the direction that I’m thinking. And it’s really that you’ve got a lot happening, and probably had even more in the past where you had, you know, schools and all that kind of stuff going on. So, I’m wondering what kind of like habits and routines you have adopted? How do you manage all of these things, all of the plates that are spinning, and how do you stay productive around all of these different initiatives?

 

Jules 

Amen, I would say the key to my productivity is doing everything I can to get eight hours asleep. I learned in law school that if I don’t get my eight hours of sleep, something in my brain just doesn’t function the way that I want it to. You know, my memory isn’t as awesome as I want it to be. So really, prioritizing sleep is so important and also just like prioritizing fun, you know, like every day, no matter how crazy busy I am, I try to have 30 minutes of fun whether that fun is I play a video game for 30 minutes, or I go run around with my dog for 30 minutes. I just do something that’s just fun for 30 minutes

 

Angie 

I heard through the grapevine that you have, you have a COVID pup that came to you through the pandemic.

 

Jules 

Yes, his name is Crypto.

 

Angie 

I love it! I’m a fellow dog mom, so I could just talk about the dog for an hour.

 

Jules 

Awesome. You know, one thing that I should that I should also kind of mention, that probably stands out a little bit about me is that I have, while I do my best to prioritize my eight hours of sleep, I do also have very bad insomnia that pops up every now and again, it’s so when I was working, you know, a nine to five or working for the courts, that could be extremely difficult to not be able to get sleep knowing that I really need sleep to be my best self. And since I’ve been able to work for myself and work towards my own vision, I found that when I have those crazy insomnia days, instead of being stressed out about it, I’ve been I’ve been able to kind of just work through it. And yeah, that’s how I picked up 3D modeling and been able to teach myself animation it was thanks to my insomnia.

 

Angie 

Gotta love it even productive like I can’t sleep. And I’m, I’ve realized that similar thing is when I have people who are trying to like accomplish a goal or want to have want to add some structure, one of the first things I usually tell them is go to bed at the same time every night and wake up at the same time every night. I’m like you, I can’t. I am. I am a zombie if I sit past 10pm, and I am not very good on anything less than seven hours and 59 minutes of sleep. And so you just need to know that about yourself and expect it and unfortunately, I’m not very fun at parties because I fall asleep very, very early on the thing. I don’t go to everybody anymore. I have to ask what’s your what’s your current? What’s your current game of choice?

 

Jules 

So, I am just finishing up Assassin’s Creed Valhalla, which is what I’m currently playing. But my favorite video game series of all time is the God of War series on PlayStation, right?

 

Angie 

So, we’ve gotten to know a little bit about you as a person. So, I’m super excited to play our little game of rapid fire together because these questions are actually gonna have really fun answers from you. So, you’re ready for a little fun. Let’s do it. Awesome. All right. Question number one is hot dog or Hamburger?

 

Jules 

Hamburger.

 

Angie 

This is hamburger. I feel like it’s depends on where you’re at restaurant, hamburger fare, or barbecue or like cookout hot dog?

 

Jules 

Yeah, if you would have said barbecue, right? I would have you know, for like brats, maybe I would have won.

 

Angie 

Maybe, I’ll have to add another another option. This is probably gonna be hard for you to distill down. But what’s your favorite movie?

 

Jules 

I love the movie 300 Gladiator. I also love Imitation of Life, which was an older movie from back in the day about a woman who was black but trying to pass is white and some of the consequences of that back in the day.

 

Angie 

I feel like both 300 and Gladiator those movies that if you still have cable and they’re on yours, at whatever point in the movie they’re at. Exactly. What’s your most memorable travel destination?

 

Jules 

Disney World.

 

Angie 

That’s awesome. I feel like there’s no other there’s no other answer to that question. And you mentioned earlier, we’re gonna have a couple books that come out of this episode, but I would love for another great book recommendation.

 

Jules 

Ah, you know what? I almost said something late. I’m just gonna go with it. My very first thing was the Bible. I love the book of Isaiah in the Bible. But my favorite book of all time besides the Bible is Mama by Terry McMillan.

 

Angie 

What is I put a lot of food questions in rapid fire because I’m usually hungry. So, if you decide to if you decide to indulge, which what’s your favorite junk food?

 

Jules 

I like gelato.

 

Angie 

Ice cream, I used to have what’s your favorite ice cream flavor in rapid fire. So, you know it comes in here some way. And then I’m going to add a new one specifically for you. I would love a great board game suggestion.

 

Jules 

And I can’t say the boring Monopoly or Scrabble there’s this game called like Clean Slate or Blank Slate or something like that, that I’ve been playing with my family when I visit them, and it’s really fun.

 

Angie 

And I would also love we’re gonna get all kinds of good resources out of your jewels. I would love a great podcast recommendation other than of course, No More Mondays.

 

Jules 

Yeah, there’s a podcast called The Second Lieutenant podcast, and I really love it. It’s ran by in a active duty Army officer right now. And it’s about education and its impact on our military personnel. 

 

Angie 

And of course, this is a show about Mondays so we always end rapid fire with asking, what’s the first word that comes to mind when I say Monday?

 

Jules 

Unstoppable. And then the second word is fearless. Yeah, unstoppable.

 

Angie 

Okay, you’re, you can have them both. But you got to tell us why.

 

Jules 

Man, because you know, by the time Friday comes around, I’m excited. I’m exhausted. I’m a little bit drained. I’m ready just for some rest or maybe even happy hour. But when Monday comes around, I’m ready to go. I’m ready to hit the ground running. I’m ready to get things done. And the more I get done on Monday, the less I have to do on Friday.

 

Angie 

I feel like that is both a very great like emotional mental yet practical combination of why and also just because you are both fearless and unstoppable. So, it just fits all the way around. And as we kind of just move into wrapping things up, I want people to know how they can follow your journey. How do they find self? Seven? How do they find you? How does everybody keep in touch and follow all the exciting, really amazing things that you’re up to?

 

Jules 

Absolutely. So my first game is about old people with superpowers. It’s really hilarious. And you can watch our progress at Saraf Seven studios. And so Saraf is s-e-r-a-p-h, the number seven and the word studios.

 

Angie 

And we will of course, link all of that in the show notes. So, if you visit no more Mondays, that info, you’ll be able to get all that stuff. And then what about you personally? How do they follow along in your journey as kind of a leader standing out in this space? 

 

Jules 

The same thing? You know, the thing about me is, I’m not a big social media person. So, you have to follow the company social media.

 

Angie 

So, Seraph7studios dot com. Say that three times fast. And as we wrap things up, I would love to get kind of just yet another pearl of wisdom, another gold nugget. So, whether it’s a quote, whether it’s a great piece of advice, what can our listeners do to get one step closer to an enjoyable career?

 

Jules 

Yes, so here’s where I have this awesome quote that I came across it a year ago, and I love it. And it is be patient with yourself because nothing in nature blooms all year.

 

Angie 

It’s so good. It’s we just are not very good at giving ourselves grace. And I feel exactly, yeah, you have to be patient with yourself. These things don’t happen overnight. When we were talking earlier. I think there was a point when you were tagging through your journey and basically alluded to that fact that you know, you gotta, you gotta kind of things take a process. So be be patient and trust that it will come. Exactly. I love it. Read that quote, one more time for us.

 

Jules 

It is be patient with yourself because nothing in nature blooms all year.

 

Angie 

There you go. Perfect parting words for an exceptional conversation. Jules, thank you so much for just sharing so much about your career journey about what you’re doing to kind of disrupt and influence and impact others who are going to go on to amazing careers. This has been such an A jam packed conversation, I love it, we could go on forever. And I really appreciate you being part of the No More Mondays and being here on my show.

 

Jules 

Thank you so much for having me. This was so much fun.

 

Angie 

And be sure to follow Jules whether you’re a gamer or not. She’s doing awesome things. And I have a feeling that we’re gonna be celebrating her accomplishments for a long time to come. So, we’re so glad that she took part in the no more Mondays movement. And as always, we love hearing what people are doing, as they figure out how to enjoy life and work and Jules is no exception. If anything, she’s a great example of that. And for those of you out there listening, I would love love love for you to subscribe to No More Mondays wherever you get your podcasts, leave us a five star rating. It’s a huge help as we continue to inspire competent professionals everywhere with these amazing stories and resources that people like Jules are creating. And if you would like to leave us comments, feedback or guest suggestions, visit us online at No More Mondays dot info. Thanks for listening to this episode of No More Mondays, we hope to grab some great insights to help you improve your professional satisfaction. Please visit us at Apple iTunes and give us a rating so we can continue to offer you awesome interviews and content each week. No More Monday’s new episodes drop every Wednesday. No More Mondays is brought to you by Career Benders, Inc in partnership with executive producer Jane Durkee. For more information about career coaching, resume writing personal branding, recruiting and entrepreneurship coaching services, visit our website at career benders.com. That’s Career Benders, B as in boy S as in sam dot com. This is your host Angie Callen signing off until next week, when we chat with another inspired confident professional.

Questions, Comments, and Guest Suggestions

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU

 

Your feedback helps us curate the best of the best as we inspire you to ditch the Sunday blues. 

If you’d like to share your experience with Mondays, leave us some constructive feedback, or recommend a guest who would be great for the Podcast, please click below to CONTACT US!