Episode 135

Hard Work Won't Cut It: What It Really Takes to Advance Your Career with Jeff Shannon

Want to take your career to the next level? In this episode, Jeff Shannon spills the beans on how he realized that “hard work isn’t enough” and found success in focusing on soft skills like relationships and strategic thinking.

Shannon also gives the lowdown on his book of the same name, Hard Work Is Not Enough: The Surprising Truth About Being Believable at Work 

(originally aired 2/16/22)

Listen Now

Jeff’s Books:

Hard Work Is Not Enough: The Surprising Truth About Being Believable at Work

Lead Engaging Meetings: A Practical Guide to Maximize Participation and Effectiveness

Connect with Jeff:

leadengagingmeetings.com

jeffshannon.com

LinkedIn

Jeff’s Bio:

A master facilitator, Jeff Shannon brings over 20 years of experience facilitating corporate strategy workshops and offsite retreats where the stakes are high. He is an expert in designing and leading highly engaging meetings that enhance participation, generate better ideas, and deliver the desired outcome. That’s why leadership teams rely on him as an experienced, trustworthy guide for their most important meetings.

Jeff leads 60 to 70 strategy, business planning, and leadership development workshops a year in a wide variety of industries for corporations, such as Cargill, Deloitte, Farm Credit Services of America, FNBO, Genentech, Kiewit Corporation, Lutz, Macy’s, and Union Pacific.

A keynote speaker and author of practical reference guides for business professionals, Jeff’s books include Lead Engaging Meetings: A Practical Guide to Maximize Participation and Effectiveness and Hard Work Is Not Enough: The Surprising Truth about Being Believable at Work.

He lives in Omaha, Nebraska, with his wife, Jen, and kids, Brady and Mallory.

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Transcript:

Angie 

Welcome to No More Mondays, the podcast that helps you navigate career challenges through the wisdom of professionals who have been at the same crossroads. I’m your host, Angie Callen, and I welcome you to join me each week as I chat with leaders, entrepreneurs, and employees who are here to share their practical, tactical advice and some inspiration on how they arrived at career and life satisfaction. From job searching and career changes to going out on your own. We are breaking down barriers and providing actionable takeaways to help you take charge of your Mondays and ditch those Sunday blues. Welcome to no more Mondays. We hear buzzwords all the time, soft skills, hard skills, but which one is really most important to building your marketability and growing in the professional world? We’re going to dig into this burning question and so much more as I welcome Jeff Shannon to the show. Jeff’s current work as a partner at Bravium a boutique facilitation and executive leadership firm totally resonates with me. I’m excited to dig into culture, leadership, and a lot of pragmatic solutions for propelling your organization and yourself forward in life and business as we get into this conversation. Oh, and by the way, before he jumped into the strategic coaching and authorship Jeff’s doing today, he was an award-winning brand director for ConAgra brands. This billion dollar company has some recognizable names under its belt, household labels like slim, Jim Duncan Hines, and my favorite go to for gluten free eat foodies. Needless to say, Jeff knows a thing or two about branding career development and optimizing your skills for today’s workforce. And I am excited to learn a thing or two for him today. So let’s welcome to the show, Jeff Shannon!

 

Jeff 

Hello there. Great to be here.

 

Angie 

Yeah, I’m excited to talk because I think you and I have lots of overlapping perspectives. And I feel like we kind of play in like the two different sides of the same sandbox. Love it. Love it. So let’s start with diving into Bravia, I want to hear a little bit more about kind of the work you’re doing there how that came to be. And so tell us about your company. Yeah,

 

Jeff 

so Bravium, and we are a facilitation, leadership development and executive coaching firm. And what that means is, is we lead meetings. So when it comes to facilitation, maybe it’s innovation workshop, a team alignment workshop, strategic planning workshop, we’re the ones who come in, and we run the meeting for you so that you can be a participant, that’s one of the big challenges that we hear from leaders is, hey, I want to host an off site. But I also I want to be a participant I want to join in, in the work to be done. And so as, facilitators, we take the reins and run that meeting. We also do leadership development at various levels in the organization, that all the fundamental skills of managing and leading people. And then we do the one on one executive coaching, with folks in all kinds of industries. And this is really

 

Angie 

driven towards building good, healthy, productive cultures across kind of all of the corporate landscape. Am I right? Yeah,

 

Jeff 

absolutely. Yeah, we, you know, we people ask us what industry we’re in, it’s like, gosh, we, we are more local than we are industry specific, meaning that we do a lot of work for just about everybody in this Midwest region. And

 

Angie 

what I like about this idea of and what I was saying about kind of living on the other two opposite sides of the Sandbox is really my work. And career coaching is all about helping people kind of find good cultures. So I always love when I talk to somebody who’s helping the leadership who’s going to hire candidates, to create them. And I feel like this is a really trending area, or even potentially kind of roadblock in corporate America today as kind of generational shifts happen in the workplace, and just all those kinds of things. Yeah,

 

Jeff 

what I’m seeing when we’re in workshops, what what the common themes are getting really clear on what we’re doing. And even more important than what we’re doing is how we’re going to do it, getting aligned on the work that needs to be done. And getting folks in the room and having that really strong dialogue and making it safe for them to have that conversation challenge each other. And challenge their own thinking tends to be the themes that I’m seeing, you know, day in and day out.

 

Angie 

And I’m guessing that before starting this kind of consulting firm, you experienced that a lot, a lot of this as a leader in you know, kind of a large multi billion dollar corporation. So give us some more backstory and kind of tell us how you got to this point in your career.

 

Jeff 

Yeah, so I started out in my career as a finance analyst. So I had a finance background joined ConAgra in 2000 and had various roles within finance you know, financial planning and analysis, insurance, mergers and acquisitions. But all along the way. I always had a side gig within the organization so I you know, I had my day job and then I had my after hours job or you know, kind of on the weekends job within the company, always doing the culture work, the leadership development work. Any of those type of side projects, I was always a person who kind of raised his hand or got asked to invite it to do those things about, I don’t know, 10 years into my career, I had the opportunity to go from supporting the business as a finance lead to running one of the businesses for the banquet brand, the banquet Frozen Foods brand. And so I got to move, you know, change seats, I went from being the copilot to the pilot of that business. And along the way, it was really those soft skills to me that transferred from one function to another that were really most interesting and most important to me. And

 

Angie 

what I think is really interesting about you and I didn’t actually know the finance background piece and it’s funny because before we came on air we got into a you know, funny conversation about the book Profit First and its author Mike McCalla Wits. And I commented on the fact that he’s just like that non traditional finance guy who’s, you know, clowny and adds personality to a really dry subject area. And I feel like you found soft skill strengths that help you build upon that technical kind of very in a box area that really drove a career trajectory.

 

Jeff 

Yeah, absolutely. For me, I think, I think if I learned anything in my career, like, I feel like that, you know, learning yourself is like the most important piece. And what I learned early on was, I was never going to be a specialist, I was never going to be that super technically proficient finance person. And so I had to figure out a way to be a generalist and like use that to be an advantage, not a disadvantage. And so for me, that was mastering the soft skills, mastering the relationships, mastering the collaboration and working with people to be known for that. Probably not known for his you know, AQa accounting acumen, but good enough when it when it came to those things, but but superpower being in those soft skills, it’s really important as it certainly as a young person, like where do I live, which one of the neither one of one’s not better than the other, it’s just figuring out which one you are right. And I think of it as specialist or generalist, which ones are you and then try to play to those strengths rather than try to fit the box that maybe the function says that you should be. I

 

Angie 

think that’s great advice, especially going into like the piece about the function. And I get on a soapbox about the fact that I struggle with how corporate America hasn’t created a growth track for people who actually have the hard skills and want to grow in that technical specialist way, it’s almost like you have to go to the soft kind of generalist angle, which, which then makes it feel and look like that one’s more important and better, when they’re just different. And you need both of them to make it work, I would just love for there to be kind of like a growth track for the people who want to remain technical specialists and grow in knowledge, just like there is that track for people who want to grow in leadership, you

 

Jeff 

know, you you love this, one of our clients actually is very deliberate about that, that they have a track and the way they describe it is you don’t have to become a people manager to get promoted, that they have a very to answer exactly what you just said. They’re in the technology and software space, and then it’s like, Nope, you can continue to get promoted on a different track based on your skills and your individual depth of expertise. Now, like you said, I don’t know a lot of them like that, but I don’t I know at least one. So there’s hope. We

 

Angie 

proven the concept. There’s one I was just gonna say makes me excited that somebody’s paving the way for that. And I think this is a good segue into talking a little bit about your book; hard work is not enough. So it’s not going to be a surprise based on everything we’re talking about, like how that book came to be. But I would, I would love for you to just give us a little bit of info about it talk about how it came to kind of conception, and especially the title, like why is hard work not enough to talk about your book? Yeah. So.

 

Jeff 

So there’s kind of like two, two, you know, stories that kind of set up the stage for this book for me. The first is, I had a talent review meeting with my manager. This is when I was in finance. I had a talent review meeting. So they got their nine box scores, and I go into have the meeting with my manager. And she basically says, Hey, you’re not promotable beyond the next level. And it was just such an absolute shock to me. I had perfect, you know, performance ratings. I was always involved in all the projects. I was completely blown away by this.

 

Angie 

And what’s going on here? Right, exactly. Yeah.

 

Jeff 

So I, I asked her like, why, what makes you say that? And what she basically told me was, is like, well, we don’t, we don’t think you can see the big picture. We don’t think you have an executive presence, and we think you’re too in the weeds. And for me, it was like, what do you do with that? How do I do anything with that? And so what I did was, well, I’m going to prove them wrong. I got mad, and I’m going to double my effort, and I’m gonna get even better at what I do. And a year later, I was in the same spot. And it’s right about that time. I was also learning how to swim because I wanted to do a triathlon, swim bike run event, and I was at the pool, and I’m trying to swim back and forth across the pool. But I’m doing horrible I could barely make it to the other side without passing out and This guy in the swim lane next to me leans over the rope and says, Hey, you’re doing it all wrong. I’m like, what? And he’s like, listen, you’re thrashing up and down this water, like a runner, like thinking that the harder you you swim, the more muscle you use, the faster you go. And that’s not how it works in water, water is 800 times denser than air, you need to stop using muscle and start being more streamlined. And within the day, I can make it down and back several times within the month I competed in my first race, you know, at 500 meters. And it was like this simple paradigm shift for me, that changed my my performance in the pool. And then I started asking myself, well, what’s invisible to me at work? What what is not working for me at work? And what it is, is like, oh, it’s not all this expertise and hard skill stuff. It’s actually the soft-skill stuff. That is what I really have to be known for. That’s what I have to master to be more believable. If I’m going to have any sort of influence and do meaningful work. It’s

 

Angie 

like Thanks, dude in the pool for the unsolicited unsolicited advice. That was basically drill distills down to that cliche idea of work smarter, not Oh, is harder. Yeah,

 

Jeff 

absolute well, and I think that what he was getting at was just like the environment, like look in your career, and in the pool, the environments changed. Because people’s expectations go up for you. So you think about like, hard work, let’s just keep it simple, hard work, when you start out the advice you get from your parents is, hey, just go and work hard. And that is a differentiator, right? In the beginning. There’s

 

Angie 

different ways to work hard. Sure, sure. Absolutely. But, but

 

Jeff 

but in the beginning, you’re proving yourself, right, yeah. And but then as you get further into your career and more experience, the expectations start to go up. And there’s actually I believe there’s a point where you go over the curve. And on the other side, if you’re working so hard, people started to go, why are you making that looks difficult? What Why do you have to work so hard? Like it’s not that complicated, right, you actually can work against you for like doing too much, or being too busy. That actually starts to get in the way of your ability to influence people. I

 

Angie 

think that’s a really good point. And there’s a there’s a message here that I want to make sure we kind of pause and highlight. And that is that there are kind of two ways you can progress into this idea of like building soft skills, because some people have them naturally. And I think some will have some people have the idea that if you don’t have it naturally, I can’t build that muscle. But you’re a very good example, real world example of having this realization and saying I need to go be better at these things. I’m not naturally good at it. Yeah, yeah.

 

Jeff 

Well, and I think I think I think there were some in there. But it was like recognizing that, like, that’s going to be the way for me that I’m not going to be able to do it the other way. And I look around and seeing other people trying to fit into a certain box. And it’s like, hey, what can I do different? How can I think about this a little bit differently? And for me, it came down to the behaviors, what are my behaviors and attitudes, that’s what differentiates people and gives them more influence in the marketplace, right? Like, once you get to a certain level, everyone’s an expert at something everyone’s known for working hard. Like, that’s, that becomes table stakes, not something that makes you different. And

 

Angie 

I liked the idea that there was there was the comment about mindset in there, because a lot of this is awareness, and having that kind of non self limiting belief that you can be greater, and that you can shift your beliefs and your perspective on something to become, you know, to differentiate yourself amongst the among those safe table stakes. Yeah,

 

Jeff 

yeah, absolutely. One of the one of the examples that I share with folks is a story called let your fire let those fires burn, right, you’re gonna have to let some fires burn so many people are out work, they’re always putting out fires, hey, what do you do to do, I’m putting out fires, you know, I’m solving problems. And it’s like, Hey, if you want to be more influential and more believable, you’re probably gonna have to start prioritizing which fires you work on, you’re gonna have to let some of them go and let some of them burn for a little bit intentionally. You don’t have to put them all out. Yeah, it’s almost

 

Angie 

like putting out fires is a little bit of a badge of honor. It’s kind of like, oh, my gosh, I’m so busy. Because it’s some sort of indication of like our worth, that’s a good idea. That’s actually a very good point to saying you can you have the choice to prioritize where you focus and how that reflects on your own professional development? Absolutely,

 

Jeff 

absolutely. And just knowing that it’s like, hey, the people who are really, really successful, they’re not successful, because they put out all the fires, they just pick which fires are most meaningful and most important to put out and that’s where they put all of their energy and they let some of the smaller ones, you know, do their thing. It’s fine. What we can we can move on without those. You will

 

Angie 

survive. Yeah, and I think this is so hard work is not enough is just book, I would let’s talk about the practical applicability of what you have put together in this work. So how can leaders or even just professionals who are looking to grow leverage your book in the workplace?

 

Jeff 

Yeah, so I’ve got a got 10 chapters in this book. And we kind of range from behaviors and attitudes to thinking more strategically, to managing people giving some good advice on how to manage people, which is get out of the way. Right? So it’s right, like, just get out of the way. That’s the headline of the

 

Angie 

right. Yeah, actually. So I’m gonna go go full circle back to something we talked about. That is where that exact instance and experiencing the opposite of that myself is when I realized that there really should be a technical growth track and like a people leadership growth track, because that’s where micromanagement comes in, is because technical people don’t know how to get out of the way, because that’s kind of all they know. But this idea of like, allowing people to do what you hired them to do is kind of like shouldn’t be as revolutionary as it is.

 

Jeff 

Yeah, I attributed to there’s a mental model I use Can I share this with a lot of folks is like, just shifting your mindset. And so I think about, okay, what’s the job of a pilot? A pilot’s job is to get all of the passengers from point A to B as safely as possible. Fair enough. Good enough definition. Yep. So that is, that is usually how we get to be someone’s manager is by being a really great pilot. The problem is, is when you are someone’s manager, now they’re working on being the pilot. And so most people don’t know what to do, like, Well, I’m a pilot. So I do pilot things, I fly the plane, I make all the choices. I’m the one responsible for everything. And if you want to be a successful manager, I would argue it’s not about being a pilot anymore. You need to start thinking more like a flight instructor. Now a flight instructors job, what’s their job? Their job is to create pilots to create more pilots, right? And how, if you were in this, let’s pretend that we’re flying together, you’re getting a lesson for me, I’m the flight instructor. And the first moment of turbulence, I grabbed the stick and takeover. I always take off I always land I only let you fly the really safe, nice weather stuff.

 

Angie 

How am I never going to learn how to navigate turbulence? I’m never going to land, learn how to land and take off.

 

Jeff 

Exactly, exactly. So So my job is to be there with you right to be your co pilot, and only get involved. When there’s eminent danger, I’m not gonna let you crash the plane, that would be foolish for both of us, right? But what I need to do is give you enough space and enough opportunity that you can become a really good pilot, the real opportunity is for you to be growing. I shouldn’t be asking you questions. I shouldn’t be setting, setting some scope and parameters allow you to bump into things somewhere in between

 

Angie 

there. And I think what you just mentioned is I think you’re exactly right. It’s not because we don’t want to it’s more about building the muscle and kind of training ourselves against the natural tendency to want to control and have a hard grip on something, because it’s uncomfortable to do that. But but this whole idea of kind of like wanting to serve people really comes into something that we’re kind of talking about throughout this season of of no more Mondays, and that’s mentorship, I would love to know kind of your perspective on mentorship, and even personally kind of how that’s impacted your career trajectory.

 

Jeff 

Yeah, I would say this, if I’m having any success at all, it’s because I’ve had a lot of help. And, and it’s hard picking the people who can be your guide through the through the forest right of growth, picking the right people to be that guide, and I’ve got and what I would say is not picking the right person, but it’s picking a group of people. I was actually having coffee with someone today and I have a friend of mine, his name’s Chris Routh. I’m gonna say his name a shout out to him. But he is my logic person. He’s my business sense person. And he’s a person I have a conversation with, even when he’s not in the room. You know, what would Chris say? In this type of situation? How would he approach this? I’ve got other people like, I don’t know if you’re familiar with Jocko willing. You know, he’s my when I feel like quitting and not being disciplined or not getting out of bed. Like if Jocko was here, what would he say? Right now, you know, having a circle of people that give you, you know, the elements that you want to be more like, right? Like, I don’t want to be like one person I’d like to like take the best for five or six people and try to make up that new person. That’s good at all of those things. That makes sense. Oh, absolutely.

 

Angie 

It’s kind of like the old adage of not being the smartest person in the room or surrounding yourself with the people that you you want to take on their their characteristics. So I’m gonna change directions because I want to talk about Jeff the human between your the firm and writing and writing and promoting a book and even at your time at ConAgra. That which was a very demanding role. I’m sure you’ve always had a lot going on. So, how do you keep up talking to me about routines and habits that you feel have helped you stay balanced pro,ductive, and sane?

 

Jeff 

Boring, that’s my that’s going to be my answer. My answer is going to be boring. As for me what works is I am Early to bed. I’m early on the wakeup I’m super consistent in myself care. Do you know I wake up every morning t,ake my HRV, and drink my glass of water? You know I get the workout in every day. I’ve got a group of people that hold me accountable for my workout and self-care. And I read a lot that I would say those are probably be my five secrets to what works for me.

 

Angie 

I mean, that’s really it’s that’s not boring. It’s just shows how practical it is to implement that kind of structure. And something that comes up a lot here on no more Mondays is the morning routine. And I have one it’s actually very similar to yours. There’s obviously books written on this, but there’s a reason it’s such a big thing.

 

Jeff 

Yeah, absolutely. For me, it is because the morning dictates for me how the rest of the day is gonna go.

 

Angie 

So tell us a little bit more about kind of us as a person. And when you’re not kind of being boring and reading and, you know, go into the gym. What kind of, you know, what rounds you out? What are you up to in your free time?

 

Jeff 

Yeah, so free time. Like I said, it’s pretty intense on the workouts every day, we tried to get the kids involved in that as best we can. I’ve got two kids, Brady and Mallory 13 and 11. My son Brady has Down syndrome. So we spent a lot of time with Special Olympics. I’m a board member there. I’m a coach. I’m a parent volunteer. So we end up spent a lot of time doing activities and events there. And I spent a lot of time, you know, shuttling back and forth, using my car rides with the kids taking them to swim practice and whatnot, as my opportunity to connect with them, and just be part of their journey as they’re, you know, figuring out who they are. I’d say the last thing we probably do that’s popular with them right now is we call it an algo Nagal. This is just our way of saying that we’re all going to pile on the sectional and get some popcorn get, some blankets, and watch a TV show together.

 

Angie 

I love it. You gotta love having teenage kids that are still into something called knuckle Maga with the family. They’re

 

Jeff 

pretty serious about it too. Like it’s like pajamas on knuckle knuckle 720 Let’s go.

 

Angie 

So one of the things that we do here on Nomar Mondays just to have a little fun as we play a game of rapid fire to get to know you better. And it’s rarely rapid. I’ll just tell you that right off the bat. So here we go. You ready? Yep, I’m ready. Hotdog or Hamburger.

 

Jeff 

Hamburger?

 

Angie 

I had a feeling that you would say that. You just referenced movie time with the family. So give us a favorite movie.

 

Jeff 

Oh, cheese. There’s so many I know. I mean classics. Fall back on is always Shawshank Redemption. Goodwill Hunting. Those are some of those the first ones flash I remember as a kid I love the movie flash like the cheesy musical queen. Do you remember that one? Yeah. I feel like shaking,

 

Angie 

Goodwill Hunting are those movies that if you’re like, you still have cable instead of streaming and you’re scrolling through and they’re on you just turn them on at whatever point they’re in. That’s right. That’s right. Absolutely. Talk to us about your most memorable travel destination.

 

Jeff 

Maroon Bells in Colorado outside of Aspen, it was this summer. And I got really bad hypothermia for being out in the bad weather making all the mistakes they tell you not to make, and that I’m too smart to be making. But I ended up in a tent. With my with my buddy Sammy wearing all of the clothes that I could put on in a sleeping bag. And we were having a conversation about like, are we gonna have to call like a lifeflight or not. So that’s pretty memorable. So

 

Angie 

we’ve talked a lot about books and loving to read and the value that they offer. And as an author, I would love for you to give us a great book recommendation on top of the probably half a dozen we’ve already talked about the illness is the key by Ryan Holiday. Oh, that’s a new one. Okay, great. I love it. Tell me why I love stills

 

Jeff 

as a key as for me, from a recency standpoint with COVID as things really slowed down to a halt. What I what I noticed in myself was this energy to feel like I need to be doing something. And I had read that book. And so I picked it up again and start reading it again about like, just like getting good at being able to be still. I don’t think that’s laziness. I don’t think that’s anything other than another craft that can be mastered to be able to just be still and not be busy and not be trying to accomplish something to just be fully present in the moment. I don’t think it’s something that happens naturally. Certainly not for me. And as I read through that book, it was really helped me think about like, hey, this isn’t a problem that we have, like this is an opportunity that I have, you know, being locked down being quarantined, to just practice being 100% happy and accepting where I’m at right now. And for me, that was a really powerful book to read right during that moment.

 

Angie 

And we live in such a busy world where busyness is supposed to indicate, you know, value that I think sometimes we lose sight of the fact that there is a lot to be gained in the stillness. So that’s a great, that’s a great recommendation. Question. Would you rather speak every world language or be able to talk to animals? Every world language? I also am wondering if you ever eat junk food? What is it? What’s your favorite junk food?

 

Jeff 

Yes, I do eat junk food. But, Hawk, gosh, I love apple fritters. Oh, for sure. Like, there really isn’t a lot of junk for that. And like my wife just bought some like, the Cheetos cheese puffs that like she bought the organic ones. Those are delicious, like somehow makes it like they’re okay, like, exactly. Food. It’s

 

Angie 

a healthy snack. And I would also love for you to give us a great podcast recommendation because of course no more Monday’s is at the top of the list. But give us another one hidden

 

Jeff 

brain has been my go to lately. I love that podcast just because it gets at the what’s happening in the brain science and the biases that we have. And like every time I listed like, Oh, that’s so true. I find myself saying that all the time. Oh, that’s spot on. I love that.

 

Angie 

And, of course, this is a show about Mondays. So what is the first word that comes to mind when I say Monday progress, why my wife’s

 

Jeff 

got a sign in her office. And I think to me just as excellent for me, which is just progress over perfection. And that Monday is the day to make another step right. That’s another week to continue to grow and get better than you were yesterday. Like I as I get older, like I don’t think when you were a kid your days were endless. And summer was forever. And now I’m like I’m getting older and like months are starting to feel the way weeks used to feel. And so I think now as Monday to be like, Hey, this is another week. If I can just get one or two major things done this week. That’s really all I need to do. Like I can be successful if I get one or two big things done. So let’s just make progress on those things.

 

Angie 

I want to let everybody know where they can find you how they can find out about Bravia how they can buy the book. So how does everybody find you and follow your journey?

 

Jeff 

Yeah, so this kind of gets to some of my boringness. I don’t do a ton of social media. So if you want to find me, there’s only there’s only a few options. One you can find the book at Amazon, Barnes and Noble anywhere books are sold online. If you want to find executive coaching or facilitation, leadership development, Bravia them hd.com. And then I post maybe once a week on LinkedIn, if you want to connect with me on LinkedIn, those are those are your three options. Perfect.

 

Angie 

And as we kind of wrap things up, there’s been lots of really great kind of practical, practical suggestions and just tools to this whole conversation. I would love for you to just bring it home with that one last big nugget of wisdom. What’s your best piece of advice on what our listeners can do to get a step closer to a more enjoyable career?

 

Jeff 

Read every day. You are not alone. And you are not the first read, read? Read. I can’t stress that enough.

 

Angie 

LeVar Burton told us whenever we were little, there was a Reading Rainbow. Follow it folks. Jeff, this has been an amazing episode of no more Mondays I want to thank you so much for being on the show and joining the no more Mondays movement. I’m so glad you’re part of the family now.

 

Jeff 

Oh, thanks so much. I and a LeVar Burton quote is fantastic. That’s great.

 

Angie 

I thought you’d appreciate that. We started with TV dinners, and we ended with Reading Rainbow. Everybody out you have a I hope that everybody out there has a great day after listening to this and you feel some motivation to go out there and make your life the best your life and career the best it can be. Jeff, thank you so much again for joining the show. We always love hearing from people who are doing what they do for work and in life, and you’re definitely no exception. Thank you again. You’re welcome. Thanks so much. For everybody out there listening. I would love love for you to subscribe to know more Mondays. Leave us a five star rating wherever you get your podcasts it is a huge help as we continue to inspire confident professionals everywhere with these amazing stories like Jeff’s. If you’d like to leave us comments, feedback or drop a guest suggestion. Visit us online at no more Mondays dot info. Thanks for joining us for another episode of No More Mondays. Tune in next week as we bring you more insights and actions to help you improve your life and career. Don’t forget visit us online at no more Mondays dot info to get all the details shownotes and recommendation from this episode. No more Mondays we drop new episodes every Wednesday. No more Monday’s is brought to you by career benders, Inc in partnership with executive producer Jane Durkee. For more information about career coaching, resume writing, personal branding, recruiting and entrepreneurship coaching services, visit us online at career benders.com