Episode 136

One of Our Favs: a Chat with Travis Rosbach, Founder of Hydro Flask

A funny thing happened on the way to the water bottle factory. While everyone was freaking out about the 2008 recession, Travis Rosbach had his head down, hustling and innovating the tech that brought you Hydro Flask, the company he founded and the metal water bottle we’ve all got sitting on our desks and rolling around in our car.

His journey has been incredibly diverse: he’s a certified Dive Master/Instructor and was a commercial airline pilot. He’s a Reiki Master, member of the Explorer’s Club, and a Fellow at the Royal Geographical Society. He’s got a lot to share, from random encounters with the Queen of England to hard-earned business wisdom.

Suffice it to say, this episode is chock full of great stories and great advice. I recommend you stop reading this and start listening.

(Re-launch from April of ’22)

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Connect with Travis:

Some of Our Favorite BooksEat that Frog by Brian Tracy, Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill

LinkedIn

The Tumalo Group

Travis’s Bio

Capt. Rosbach has spent the last three decades enhancing his entrepreneurial skills. Throughout the years, Mr. Rosbach has been proud to invent and found Hydro Flask®, work as a business broker, fly as a Commercial Airline Pilot, become a Professional Speaker, and start The Tumalo Group.

As an Advisor, Mr. Rosbach’s clients include various industries, celebrities/high net-worth individuals/families, start-ups, mid to large companies, and even countries.
He not only shares his tradecraft with others but also practices it in the many startups in which he is currently involved.

Besides Entrepreneurship, Mr. Rosbach’s Experience Includes:

– SCUBA Dive Master/Instructor (PADI 158190)
– US Merchant Marine Boat Captain (50 Tons)
– Commercial Airline Pilot (ATP)
– Oregon Contractors License
– Hawai’ian REALTORS License
– Yoga Instructor 500 Hour Hatha and Kundalini (NOT 3HO)
– Reiki Master
– Member of The Explorers Club
– Fellow at the Royal Geographical Society

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Transcript:

Angie 

Welcome to no more Mondays, the podcast that helps you navigate career challenges through the wisdom of professionals who have been at the same crossroads. I’m your host, Andy Callen, and I welcome you to join me each week as I chat with leaders, entrepreneurs and employees, who are here to share their practical tactical advice, and some inspiration on how they arrived at career and life satisfaction. From job searching and career changes to going out on your own. We are breaking down barriers and providing actionable takeaways to help you take charge of your Mondays and ditch those Sunday blues. Welcome to no more Mondays. Hello, everybody, and welcome to another episode of no more Mondays podcast. As usual, I’m your host, Angie Callen. Are you drinking some water over there? If you carry a reusable bottle around with you, there’s a good chance it’s a fancy dancy Hydro Flask. And guess what? We have got the guy who invented it on today’s show. Travis Rosbach may be the founder of a very popular portable drinking vessel. However, he’s a whole lot more from a divemaster to a commercial pilot. Yes, that would be captain Rosbach to you, Yogi Reiki master, a member of the Explorers Club, a fellow at the Royal Geographical Society, the list goes on. He’s got his hands on a lot of things. We’re gonna learn a little bit about his founders journey, but more about how that springboarded him into advising and coaching entrepreneurs and maybe this entrepreneur will even get a few tips. So I hope you will all help me. Welcome to the show. Travis Rosbach. Travis, welcome to no more Monday’s

Travis 

Well, thank you as you for having me. That was a heck of an intro. 

Angie 

I’m kind of known for that. You know, I I write resumes. So I feel like I have to like take that and carry it over into into intros.

Travis 

Well, next time I need a CV I’ll call Yeah, that’s good to know.

Angie 

Okay, cool. Deal. That sounds like a deal. I feel like your experience may speak for itself. However, let’s, let’s talk a little bit about Hydroflask. So, you know, we live in the driest mountains of Colorado where everybody carries around a water bottle all the time. So I’m curious, just as a foundation of of your entrepreneurial journey and success. How did you even get into that space? Product Development isn’t you know, isn’t always easy. Talk to us a little bit about Hydroflask. And then we’re going to talk about how it springboarded you and other things.

Travis 

Yeah, well, so I guess backing up a bit when I was I started college to become an airline pilot. And so in in school in college, I worked during the day at a rock climbing store called red point climber supply in terrible in Oregon. And also we had one in Bend. So I was I was accustomed to drinking out of plastic reusable water bottles back in the late late 90s and early early 2000s. And so I just I loved not having to use the plastic one time single use water bottles. So fast forward, I had a sign company in a while who Oh, who signs in screen printing. And I was thirsty. I was just, I was out running errands and I got thirsty. So I saw a sporting goods store and I pull into the parking lot and I go in I’m like, I need a plastic water bottle. And I say plastic because I don’t want to say the name of the company too often. But I said the brand name and they’re like, ah, yeah, well

Angie 

about that. They start with an N.

Travis 

It does. It may very well start with an N and none of the employees wanted to show me that I’ll and finally one of them’s like, Okay, fine. Come on. I’ll show him. And so we go to the aisle and the entire wall was completely empty. There was like three bottles on it. I was like, Whoa, what happened? Like there was a run on water bottles last night. Hmm. He has now the owners French she just got back from Europe. There some articles she read her dad’s doctored hold long story short, we don’t know what this stuff is called. But it’s in plastic and it’s not supposed to be good for us. So she just made us pull all these water bottles off the shelf and I don’t know what we’re going to do with them. I said, Well, who’s gonna fill back up that shelf? And he said, nobody. There’s nobody else and it hit me. Angie, right in the back of my head on the right side here and it came out my mouth. I will I will do that. And the guy just started laughing. But at the here’s my big word. I’m only gonna use one quarter word today 125 cent word it’s juxtaposition. I probably screwed it all up that juxtaposition right there where I said I will do that and he said, Haha, I saw the future. I saw myself standing on stage talking about this highly Successful water bottle company in the future. You know, it’s like, oh, gosh, I don’t know what happened just now. But I guess I’m doing a water bottle company. So I started Hydroflask

Angie 

when when inspiration smacks you in the face that hard you did well, better listen,

Travis 

it almost knocked me over. Yeah, I have no other choice. And then every time I would think, Oh, good, maybe I don’t have to do a water bottle company. I don’t know anything about product design, or engineering or any of that bringing products to market I know about printing and advertising. And I know that world. But I don’t know about product world. And every time it would start to get hard, like some unseen force would just come in and be like, Nah, man, you’re seriously doing the water bottles now. And I ended up just seriously doing the water models.

Angie 

So from a practical perspective, how did you navigate that skill and knowledge gap? Like you said, you didn’t know you didn’t know about product development, r&d, or go to market or any of that stuff? How did how did you overcome that?

Travis 

I didn’t know what I didn’t know what I didn’t know. I just I knew that everything was getting made in China in 2007. And China was the place to go. And I tried to go with this guy who does field trips to the Canton Fair, where you go and you meet a factory. And I was like, hey, I want to go do a water bottle. Can I come with you on a field trip to the Canton Fair to China? He’s like, No, that’s stupid. Nobody wants water bottles. I’m not taking you with me. There’s no water bottle factories. You can’t come. I was like, I’ll pay you, you know. And he’s like, No, I don’t want your money. It’s it’s not it’s no, it’s no good here because there’s no such thing. And so I sold my I sold my moped and I sold my longboard and I sold my girlfriend’s moped. And I showed up in Shanghai to a place that over fax, told me that they were willing to do it insulated metal water bottle, and I show up, and I walk in. It’s it’s not easy to get to China and find a building in downtown Shanghai in 2008. But I show up, I find them I go in, I find the guy whose name is on the bottom of the facts. I’m like, Hey, it’s me. I’m Travis. I’m here to do the water bottles insulated, double wall, right? He’s like, Nah, we just do plastic. Oh, come on. And so it was just a series of Gosh, darn it. And then holy cow. That was awesome. Right back to back to back to back for years.

Angie 

I’m sitting over here laughing because any 25 year old out there is going wait, huh? A fax and like, couldn’t go to Google Maps and on your phone and say, Where is the water bottle guy in Shanghai. And the reason I bring that up is also a laughing there was a fair amount of commitment and conviction here. You sold some stuff you sold some of your girlfriend’s stuff, you know, like, you’re like, I’m almost all in and wouldn’t take no for an answer.

Travis 

Well, I saw the future. And the future had me talking about water bottles and sounds like well, you can’t argue with the future. And we that’s gotta be real.

Angie 

So what was the turning point or the magic moment that things actually came together? And that whole kind of like two steps back one step forward, two steps back actually got you in to an r&d phase and actually making this start to look like it was going to be reality?

Travis 

Well, in Shanghai, I got, like, especially back then, when I was younger, in my late 20s, or mid 20s, I had a little bit more of a temper. And I got pissed. I mean, I spent all my money I spent, I was like, I’m on the far side of the world here. And it says Mike, on the paper in three lines up, it says, Yes, we can do that. I’m standing here with Mike. And Mike’s now saying no. Dang it, Mike, what are we gonna do here? So I started to leave. And some guy comes up and grabs my arm and he’s like, Hey, man, I got a cousin down in Hanzo, who might be able to help you. I was like, I don’t even know what that means. But it sounds like that. I’m gonna do that. So he writes two things on two pieces of paper wants to get to the train station wants to get to hon Joe and I ended up in Hanzo.

Angie 

And it’s not a language you read, I’m assuming no, no,

Travis 

I can barely get through the English language. Don’t push me on anything else because there’s no yeah, there’s no knowledge of that. So I ended up in honcho, and then I realized, oh, man, I don’t know what to do. Once I get time Joe. And the train station had like 4 million people like easily seriously, there was 4 million people at the train station. And I’m calling Oh, shoot. I have no place to stay. I don’t have much money left. I don’t know who I’m looking for. I don’t know what I’m doing. Luckily, I was one of the if not the only white guy in the entire place. And this woman came up and she’s like, You must be Travis. Like, I assure him, are you Natalie? And she says, Yep, it was it was hit the guy’s cousin’s wife. And she’s like, Alright, let’s go build some water bottles. I’m like, okay, cool. And so her and her husband, Michael and I, we spent the next I mean, really three years building machines to build machines to build machines to build a bottle, or a cap, and mixing plastics and mixing metals and just experimenting with, you know, all of these little things that go into building a water bottle, which I found extremely interesting. You know, it was it was fascinating.

Angie 

And if I, if I remember correctly, tell me if I’m wrong. Hydroflask was the first kind of non plastic that metal. You you kind of disrupted and created a whole new line of products. It wasn’t even just a new brand. Right,

Travis 

right, right. Yeah, no, exactly. Yeah, no, we were. So my grandpa has, and I actually have it here. But my grandpa had an old Stanley thermos that was metal with glass on the inside. And as double wall, I believe vacuum insulated, or at least it was at one time, but it weighed 800 pounds. You drop it on your foot, you’re breaking your leg, and it stunk. It was nasty. And it just was cumbersome. It wasn’t ergonomically correct. And so I had this kind of like, Vision dream of having a double wall, stainless steel, and not and I also had a tumbler that was metal on the outside and plastic on the inside. And it kind of kept my ice a little bit colder longer, or my warm drinks a little bit longer. But then when the plastic thing was ixnay, that was no good. So I was like, Well, I don’t want to do glass. I don’t want to do plastic. What if we did another layer of metal? And and Michael was like, Yeah, sure. Let’s just do that. And so we go to the vacuum factory. At that time, there were only like, two, we go to the first one. And they’re like, yeah, no, we’re not going to work on American Water bottles that that’s not worth it. And the second one said the same thing. They’re like, No, we’re not. We’re not in the water bottle factory business. We just had the vacuum. And so we actually made the first couple prototypes, Michael and I and a bunch of factories around the Union College in LA area of China. And we got him and we go and we’re like, hey, I’ll pay 100 bucks if you’ll just put this on the vacuum. And they’re like, Okay, fine. And so they put it in the vacuum. 24 hours later, we get it back. And by golly, it worked. It was like, Ah, okay, cool. Well, now that we made one, do we make a few more? And they did. They’re like, alright, we’ll make you 3000 But that’s it, cuz nobody’s gonna buy him. It’s like done,

Angie 

and how fast were they gone?

Travis 

How fast I would say probably about a month. Realistically, it took we we really just had to pick up our first sales rep. And as soon as we have picked up our first sales rep, it was off to the races. Because again, like you said, it was the first nobody had seen this before. It was a technology that that didn’t exist, but it was practical. People started drinking water they started feeling better, they were healthier and just physically more vibrant and just cognitively functioning better. And then they became addicted drinking water via these metal water bottles.

Angie 

It’s this terrible terrible trend to start Travis like who knew? Who knew that there would be and this is I think is almost integral to just who you are with wanting to have kind of impact Yeah, it started with like, we need a better water bottle but then look what it ended up doing. It made people kind of healthier and innovated in a space that now you know those things that we all carry around that start with a why that keep our drinks hotter? It like this is the technology that started that whole product evolution.

Travis 

Yeah, yeah, yeah. Yeah, it was a lot of work. It was a lot of work. I spent months and months and months and months in those factories. And it was the blind leading the blind It was just that blind guy knew how to use a welder and I didn’t so I just be like, Hey, could you do this? And I’d be like, No, Mike just try me do it. You’d be like Well fine, we could do that but doesn’t mean we’re going to sure enough now all the water bottles are made that way.

Angie 

Again, don’t take no for an answer. And and so I’m curious now you and your growth through this. So obviously you picked up tons of practical knowledge about how to vacuum seal a double walled stainless steel steel bottle but I’m curious from your own like personal professional development. You know how you you mentioned in kind of your bio that this helped you build certain skills and professionalism. I would love to for you to tell us how you grew more through this as a person and a professional.

Travis 

Oh, tremendously. I grew a lot I’d had. I’d had employees before we’d had multiple companies, my girlfriend at the time, we’d had a sign company and a fence company. And we, we kind of experimented in different industries. And so I’d had a lot of employees and I’d had multiple businesses before, but Hydroflask was, it was an international thing. You know, it wasn’t like, I’m going down to the local Rotary Club and trying to, you know, sell my services or my product. This was, I’m going to Korea, I’m coming to England, I’m going to Germany, I’m trying to sell my I’m hocking my wares all around the planet. And so I had to quickly learn, like, how to do business without getting cease and desists. But also doing guerilla marketing, without much money. You know, it’s like, you don’t want to get sued, because there’s a lot of cash that goes into getting sued. But how do you how do you push the envelope right up before you get that cease and desist. And then I just learned about like, just basic, like finances, and you know, it, the water bottles back then cost I think like $5.50, to manufacture and to land. And now they’re still about the same except for the cola shaped bottles that were like $3. And she’s made billions good for her that other brand. But like it, it becomes really expensive when you start selling 40,000 a month and 80,000 a month, like how do you get enough money to buy bottles, and typically would have to buy a mic for five months, we’d have to pay for them four or five months before we actually receive the money back by the time they ship and then they get warehoused, and then they get laser engraved, and then they get shipped again, and then they get sold and then the net 30. And then finally get money. Like I learned really quickly that it it, it actually kind of does take money to make money. And you have to have big money if you’re gonna do big things

Angie 

to words, cash flow, Chow,

Travis 

well, and then and then what do you need? When you have more product and more sales? You need more people? So what do you need, when you have more people, you need more money. And so, you know, it’s typically the owner that takes the biggest hit, you know, and that that suffers the most. And so it was there was a lot of suffering for a lot of years for me personally, just to make sure that we had the bottles and we had the employees and we had heat and we had air conditioning and we had food. But yeah, I learned I learned a tremendous amount about you know, corporate espionage and theft and how people can steal and how employees can screw you over. And, and a lot of good too. I learned a lot of beautiful stories about marriages that stayed together, because they both felt better. And the husband’s performing better and the wives losing weight. And I heard all of these hundreds and 1000s of stories that just like they would give me it was my fodder to keep me going my fuel my energy to keep me going in this this this world water bottles. It

Angie 

seems like such a trivial thing, water bottles, but when you can, when you can grasp on to that bigger kind of like why or the purpose or the impact that you’re having? I think it makes it not necessarily easier. But you can have a stronger commitment to pushing through all of that kind of hard stuff. And that in and of itself is a is a great lesson. And do we use the kitschy term amount of grit to to have? Because now as you go forward in your entrepreneurial endeavors, everything’s gonna seem a lot easier.

Travis 

Yeah, for real? Yeah, yeah.

Angie 

So speaking of what are you up to? Now I know you’ve got the Tumalo group. And so tell us a little bit more about where this, this whole road has let you lead you and what you’re doing today?

Travis 

Well, I’m still doing a number of things I get, I get kind of bored easily if I’m not kind of pushing the envelope. But now I have a child so I don’t ride motorcycles or fly airplanes and, and jets anymore. But I got chainsaws and I started cutting trees. I’ve got a bunch of trees on my property that are a non native species of juniper. And so they need to go because they suck up all the water and you know, long story with that. But I’m also doing Yeah, the Tamila group, and I’m kind of rebranding it into the Ross bat group. And I’m helping American businesses do business more and more in America, I help I have a really good Rolodex for Chinese factories. And so I’ve been doing that predominantly for the last, I don’t know, 510 years helping people get products made overseas, and walking them through that whole process. And we still do that because sometimes it’s still just better and easier and maybe not easier, but it’s the only way we can get stuff made as we have to go overseas, but if we can, or bring it back home to America and American manufacturing, so I help startups and I also help other businesses that have been working with other international factories to rehome. And come back and how it’s actually kind of difficult to find American factories. And it’s hard to work with some of these good old boys that are just stuck in their way. And it’s, it gets frustrating. But when I do find a diamond in the rough, it’s like, oh, yeah, let’s just run with that factory. And that’s like, it’s just really cool to find those sweet spots.

Angie 

Because it’s not always about I know, there’s that whole, like, you know, don’t outsource manufacturing, don’t outsource manufacturing. But from a practical perspective, like you said, it, we can’t find all of the manufacturing we need in the US necessarily, or it takes a certain amount of legwork to do it. So I think it’s awesome to have that kind of central be that central resource to people trying to kind of bring it back to domestic.

Travis 

We can’t, there’s a lot of things we just cannot and do not and more than likely will not be making in America in the foreseeable future. We have EPA, we have certain administration’s we have lack of funding, we have lack of employees, we have this whole new generation that some of them don’t even really want to work. There’s a multitude of factors that just make it unrealistic to manufacture in the United States. And so what do we do? Well, we either go without, and that’s an option, or we go to reputable factories that are paying their employees a very decent, livable wage. And it’s not a scary place that sometimes the media likes to portray. And we always like to have the bad guy and sometimes, you know, we we, we see on the mainstream media that the the Chinese factories are the bad guy sometimes. And right now we have another country that oh, they’re the bad, scary bad guy. Well, okay,

Angie 

we got plenty of bad guys at home too. But I feel like that’s a different podcast. So just, like out of curiosity, from a very simple kind of entrepreneurial branding piece. Why the shift from the Tumalo group to Ross back? The Ross back group?

Travis 

Yeah, I’ve been, I’ve been asking myself that too. And a lot of people have been asking me, I think it goes back to two main things. One is the tableau group was, was predominantly manufacturing things in China. And, and I know it’s just a name, and that’s that, but I also I get bored after about four or five years. So it’s like I needed to challenge in my life, I guess. And for some reason, I decided to do a rebrand and redo the website and redo all of the material and marketing and copy and pantones and branding, and oh my goodness, I guess it’s almost like I’m just a glutton for punishment.

Angie 

Because why not? Right? It’s funny. So career vendors, my company has been, we just had our five year anniversary. And I have that same kind of like, do we call it itchy trigger finger, not that we’re gonna like completely rename or rebrand, but I’m like, we need a brand refresh. Because I think it’s that same kind of entrepreneurial spirit that it’s like, okay, like, I’ve done this for a while. And now I gotta, like, you know, get some different sensory activity happening here and

Travis 

just change it up. Yeah, yeah, just added a little new pizzazz or just like, recirculate the blood a little bit, just get it flowing differently, and more and, again, differently with new ideas coming from it. I’m also getting to the point where I’m getting really frustrated with the water bottle market. And the technology. On the shelves all is about the same. There’s just so many knockoffs doing the exact same thing. And I kind of want to shake that up. And so I’m kind of quietly working on another water bottle project that I think, you know, people are like, Oh, it’s a flooded market, no pun intended, but there’s just 1000 of them. There’s no way you can make money and like, I like that challenge. I like that bet. Because now because before I was the first now I’m like the 900 Millions. Okay, well, let’s see if I go from 900 million to number one again, like what if I could just go knock Hydroflask job. And a part of me kind of wants to also just for the heck of it.

Angie 

I always say the easiest way for me to like if you want me to accomplish a goal, you tell me I can’t do something. Yeah. Which I think is exactly what you’re facing. Right before you got to pioneer now. You had to go Disrupt.

Travis 

Yeah, exactly. I think now that’s gonna be a lot harder than than being the first and so I really enjoyed the idea of that. Challenge

Angie 

out of curiosity was was the Hydroflask technology patented did you go through that process?

Travis 

So the vacuuming technology those patents had expired and or they were just in a for us. The patents that we got were that I got were design patents. So they were for sizes and shapes and things like that.

Angie 

Which is why there’s 9999 competitors now, right? Yeah. But then again, hey, let’s see what Travis does. Y’all just got a little teaser from Travis and some potentially some potential new product developments. We would be happy to be test market Travis just so you know.

Travis 

Oh, for sure. I’ll send you some. I’ll send you some for real. Oh, yeah, absolutely. You guys got some comments? As soon as they hit? I’ll get you some

Angie 

cool. We like we like prototypes. Let’s take a turn. Because you you also are mountain folk.

Travis 

Yeah, I just shaved my beard last week, actually. Yeah.

Angie 

Well, and I saw your pictures. I was like, yeah, you’ve got like, you know, the good old Colorado beard. It’s so funny when I have East Coast, East Coast men that are like, should I shave my beard for this interview? I’m like, I am the wrong person to ask because everybody here has appeared.

Travis 

It’s a man’s asking to shave his beard to come on a podcast. That’s an east coaster. Yeah.

Angie 

Yeah. Yeah. That’s an east coaster. But I know that, you know, I’m a big fan of kind of like, you know, we do a lot of outdoor adventuring to kind of keep you rat well rounded. Try new things. I know you’re a big fan of the environment. And that’s where a lot of your kind of like social impact and inside work goes. And you’ve got some causes you you support. Tell me a little bit about some some of that stuff that the real Geographical Society. I know you’re an Explorers Club, like, how do you get out in adventure?

Travis 

Yeah, all right. Well, so I kind of live I live a bit remote. I’m outside of town. And I’ve got a fair bit of property that I just kind of alienate myself and isolate myself and doing some logging, as I mentioned, and some homesteading and I’ve got four massive dogs and building stuff. And so I’m not traveling as much as I used to I have a child now I’ve got a daughter. And so that takes up a tremendous amount of time, believe it or not, and it’s all good time. But finding ways for her and I to get out into the world and out into the outs back and out into the big cities and just kind of exploring and, and I’m still exploring life. But I’m seeing it now more through her eyes than just mine. And it’s a lot of fun, because I’m going back to places I’ve traveled before but with a you know, with the seven year a six year old, it’s like it’s a whole nother lens. It’s a whole nother filter to see life through. So that’s that’s kind of what I’m doing. And then yeah, the Royal Geographical Society. That’s so cool. They’re like, you want to be a fellow like, well, that sounds pretty fancy. I always wanted to be a knighted. I always thought that when I met the Queen, I’d like to save her life. That didn’t happen. I met her and it was like fairly uneventful. I mean, we just chatted, there was no death threat. And so I didn’t get knighted. So like the next best thing I thought would be well, fellow at the Royal Geographical Society is pretty cool. And then the Explorers Club here in the States, they’re based out of New York. That’s cool. They’re doing all kinds of really neat expeditions all over the place. And it’s going to be interesting in the next few years to see. As we learn more and more about this, this place, where we live and what the truth is about the boundaries and the limitations that we have. It’ll be interesting to see. I think we live in a great time. And we’ve got a lot of neat stuff coming ahead. I think it’s gonna get harder before it gets easier. But I think if we can stick it out and hang in there, we’re in for really good times coming.

Angie 

I think you’re right. It’s, uh, it I 100% agree that there’s definitely some challenges and some, some things that make you go happening. But if you also think about all the potential that we have, if we take the right approach, and steward what we have, well, there’s so much so many amazing things that can come but I have a bone to pick with you. Because I did not know I was one degree from the queen. How did you meet her?

Travis 

You know, it’s, it’s like this, my life just works this way. It’s the darndest thing. Like I was hanging out with Oprah asking myself the same thing like how do you how do you get a one on one with Oprah? You know, I like a lot of people freak

Angie 

out. Do you get a one on one with Oprah?

Travis 

I know I still ask myself that. Oh, I’m with the queen. I was up in British Columbia for my birthday. And there was just a billion people. Maybe that might be hyperbole. There is 10,000 People at the parliament house. And so I was kind of like walking in the street to stay out of the grass and away from the masses. And this, I think it was a bit late or not a

Angie 

bit. Rural. Are they rolls? Yeah, it

Travis 

was a Rolls Royce. Yeah, it was. I remember, it’s just a cream color, beautiful British luxury vehicle pulled up. And the door opens like right in front of me. And so I have to stop. And out comes the queen. And so the queen looks at me like, Oh, Hi, are you the one I’m supposed to greet? I’m like, wow, I guess I’m here to greet her. And yeah, so we start chatting, like, we just start talking. And so she takes my arm and I’m walking her up the aisle to her speech. And then security kind of like there was like just this blip of like chaos because nobody really knew what was going on in the Queen’s here. I would just panic. And then the security’s like, oh, wait, who are you? Like, I’m Travis. I’m here, just mocking the Queen up to her speech. And they’re like, oh, no, it’s supposed to be the like the Prime Minister. Like, oh, sorry. Prime Minister. I can’t remember this was years ago. I can’t remember who it was. But he’s like, I’ll take it from here. Like, okay, yeah, here you go. Okay. Bye. Nice to meet you. So nice to meet you. So sure enough, I saw her again later. And we waved at each other. And ironically enough, I’d been at her house, just like a year before. And I got to I was at Buckingham Palace. Again, just walking along, minding my business in London, my first day there. And these people just start mad dash into the in through the gates into Buckingham Palace. So I just kind of followed the flow. And I met I met this this, this girl, and she’s like, Hey, you want to you want to come with me behind the curtain? Like, I want to go with you. I was like, 20 like, Yeah, I’ll go behind the curtain with you. So I go behind the curtain with her. She gives me a private tour of Buckingham Palace. And so when I met the Queen, I was like, I’ve been I’ve been to your you know, bedroom door. And you know, we talked talked about that and stuff. So

Angie 

nothing creepy about that. I feel like you were just as close to being knighted as you were a word of being arrested by the Royal police. But okay. Okay, that was an unexpected and real and fun story. And now I can say I am one degree from the queen from Oprah and Julia Child, my life has been made. And so let’s go back to entrepreneurship now, because I don’t know what else to do with that story. Travis. I would love let’s give you some. We’re I love practical things. I like tactical actionable advice. So I am curious loaded question. What advice do you have to entrepreneurs out there who are trying to start up grow scale, navigate the ups and downs in the market? How can we be successful,

Travis 

I think turn off the TV. turning off the TV is good is number one. Don’t watch any of the stock market, don’t watch any of the reports don’t listen to any of the bullocks that’s on TV period. Hydroflask was born and took off during the Oh 809 times. And I didn’t have a TV. I didn’t listen to anything going on. I put my head down. And I made water bottles, and I sold water bottles and people bought water bottles. And we did really well. And so I think for people to to get freaked out every time they you know, it’s just a scare tactic you turn on the TV, we all know what sells it sucks and horror. And so if you’re not watching sex, and you’re watching horror, you know, you’re you’re being sold something and typically you’re not being sold the truth. And the truth is my recommendation anyway. Just put your head down work. Because if your competition turns on the TV and gets scared and goes and hides in the corner under a blanket, well then who’s going to win the blanket guy? Are you because you’re hustling? So I think don’t get wrapped up in in the mainstream. doom and gloom. That’s number one, and just have faith and confidence that no matter what, people are going to still buy stuff. They’re still going to consume things. They’re still gonna spend their money. I talked to my tattoo artist, and like, How’s his business and he’s like, you know, even though people might not have money to pay rent, they still have money to get an Instagram tattoo. And so he’s he’s not concerned at all. And that’s how I feel. I feel like hey, people are gonna have money to buy your product as long as you have a good product or you have a good service and people are still going to need you know, services even if they don’t have many resources to acquire it. It’s also a really good time to get creative and think about other services we’ve been, we’ve been doing it this way for 20 years, good. Today’s a new day, let’s do something completely and radically different. Let’s think about the opposite way to do the exact same thing. And those are the gonna be the people who who make it and survive. A lot of the big corporations, the big money, businesses, were all started during recessions and depressions and downturns and stock crashes. And this isn’t that. So the others, a lot of it was nefarious, and those people are going to be called out and they’re going to go to prison, I hope and I’ve seen that happen more and more. But the honest true ones. Man, now’s the time to do it. Now is the time to get into business now is the time to be an entrepreneur, now is the time to launch products that people need and want and will consume. And, again, they may not have any money, but they can still buy what you have, as long as it’s good product honestly given to him for an honest and fair price. Who that’s not like a soap box.

Angie 

Well, it was a great soap box, because there’s about 12 little nuggets in there, I’m gonna just pull out and reiterate. First of all, there is a market for every product at every price point, always you just have to make sure you’re appealing to it. And then second point, having the confidence and the faith and the trust in your product to fulfill that. That reality. Yes. It’s funny, I’ve been reading. There’s I’m a how Elrod fan so he’s the Miracle Morning. And then he came out with the miracle equation. It’s, it’s what I would call the new it’s the new version of thinking Grow Rich, right? Unwavering, unwavering faith and extreme effort will get you results. And that is exactly what all of your soapbox, in my opinion equals. Because it means prioritizing the stuff that’s going to get you results over TV except for Ted lasso because it is the most hopeful inspirational time you can spend in front of a boob tube. There you go. It’s Season Three just premiered. So it’s on my mind, however. And I that came to my mind only because you’re totally right about the doom and gloom. I’m also another book I’m a big fan of eat the frog, which is Brian tracing. But Tracy Tracy, Brian

Travis 

Tracy, Brian Tracy got me to where I am. Yeah,

Angie 

yes. And literally in that book, it says don’t read the news. It’s a waste of time. Yeah. And okay, maybe you need to know if like a hurricane is coming. If you live on the coast, you have to generally people

Travis 

will tell you, your neighbors will tell you the police will show up. You don’t need the TV. Your radio will come on your phone. My husband

Angie 

will tell me. Yeah, exactly. Because otherwise, it’s it is it’s kind of like you can over consume it. It’s a waste of time. And you can find any perspective and any answer to any question that you want to find. So it’s, it isn’t now I’m on the soapbox with you. We have a soapbox, that I think that I think we need to have that soapbox episode we were talking about earlier. But we’re all we’re all come full circle. As you had mentioned, you had mentioned earlier, that like getting uncomfortable piece, which I think is what that whole component is about is like, not just doing the easy things or doing the things you’ve always done. But getting a little uncomfortable trying some things to serve new markets, because innovation is huge. When the economy is interesting, right?

Travis 

It will and that’s Yeah, anything that can you know, a lot of times, like hardships will spark creativity. It’s also like, I don’t have this, or I long for that. I want life to be easier, even just a little bit in this area. And so will what makes life easier in that lane. Well, this would work. Okay, well then just do that. You know, because chances are if you’re the if you’re feeling that there’s there’s five or six other people around you feeling that and chances are there’s 50 or 60,000 other people, at least that are also feeling that and sometimes that’s all you really need.

Angie 

We interviewed Joel Gratz, who’s the founder of the open SNOW app, which which aired just recently. And you know, we’re we’re fan kids of Joel and open snow around here because we love to ski and it’s the most accurate ski forecasts you can find. And he did exactly what you just said. So for all of you who want to like put two and two together out there. His pain point was he couldn’t get an accurate ski forecast. And so he’d show up to a mountain. And then they blow the forecast and he’s thinking he’s gonna get a 10 inch powder day and he gets a one inch powder day and he had a meteorological background. So he just decided to start sending text it started as a text to 37 people. Hey, here’s the forecast you can expect that grew into a blog and now it’s an app that serves every state Go to major ski resort in America. And he’s got hundreds of 1000s of downloads. So it’s all because he found a need, he wanted to fulfill himself and found out other people had that same pain point.

Travis 

And he had the meteorological background, to pull it off and to ask the right questions and ask more questions and more questions still.

Angie 

Yeah. So you just you never know where an idea will take you. And I feel like as a point of inspiration, you will owe it to yourself out there to kind of lean into those ideas and see where they take you. And I would say take inspiration from Travis and that idea of not taking no for an answer and really pushing it as far as you’re able. Because if you did take a no for an answer. You just stayed in the US and been down to Mote mopeds and a longboard.

Travis 

That would have sucked. My head Hydroflask.

Angie  

Yeah. And then yeah, there’ll be no Hydroflask. So let’s, as we kind of like start to wind things down. I feel like there’s so many fun conversations we could have. But in the interest of not having a five hour episode of no more Mondays, How does everybody kind of follow along you? Maybe the upcoming potential new product like how do we stay up to date on your adventures? How do we find you?

Travis 

I’m kind of hard to find right now. I am on LinkedIn, Travis Ross Beck, RLS, ba ch on LinkedIn. And I have an assistant who goes through and she tries to keep up and I try to keep up with people reaching out through there. But it’s also Travis at Tamila group or info at tomoloo group.com TUMALO gr o up.com.

Angie 

And, well, I apologize, your assistant now has one more request to field because I connected with you on LinkedIn before we started recording so you can likely find Travis in my network. I also apologize, I will fill up your entire newsfeed and that is my job as a career coach and resume writer on LinkedIn.

Travis 

Oh, she needs to earn or keep so that’s good.

Angie 

But I would this I’m excited to see kind of what’s coming. I’m,

Travis 

I’m excited. I think it’s I’m at the point where it’s either gonna take off and it’s gonna be like home. Oh my goodness, that’s cool. Or it’s like, okay, I tried and no harm no foul, you know, like, but that’s that was my my thought was Hydroflask is like, I have 3000 bottles. I can find 3000 people to buy one. I have friends I have family. I don’t mind knocking on random people’s doors going up and down the streets hockey and selling water bottles. I can go to the the flea market or the the swap meet and I can I can I can sling 3000 water bottles. And if I sell them for 10 bucks, even better, I’ve doubled my money. Well, we ended up selling for 20. It’s like, oh, even better, of course, then, you know, finances kick in, then you have to go buy more. But yeah, we’ll see. I think it’s I think it’s gonna be a good thing. I really do.

Angie 

I’m excited to follow along and see what comes out. And I’m also going to just make another point out of what you just said, is that like, you looked at that worst case scenario. Worst case scenario is I got three, I got friends, I got 3000 friends who’ve got a nice new water bottle, and I kind of broke even right. So if you look at it that way. Big scary big, hairy audacious goals don’t seem so big, hairy and audacious. If you just look at it in a really realistic, you know, what could happen? But what can happen kind of way?

Travis 

Yeah, I honestly also kind of wanted to go to the Maldives and go fly twin otters on floats, because I was a seaplane pilot for the airlines down in the Caribbean before that. And so I was kind of secretly hoping that I get through the 3000 I’d make enough money to go to the Maldives and move over there and go be a pilot. And it’s ironic because as soon like the better and better the business did the more and more opportunities I had that I had to say no to because I was in the business. But yeah, being a bush pilot up in Alaska would have been would have been good too. But that’s another lifetime

Angie 

and Hydroflask had another plan for you.

Travis 

Yeah, yeah. For better or worse. As we

Angie 

say goodbye to everybody here listening. Let’s leave them with one last little piece of inspiration. So pearl of wisdom. You’re kind of golden nugget. We’re all about no more Mondays around here. What’s your number one piece of advice on how people out there have a more fulfilling career and life?

Travis 

I think that we need entrepreneurs right now. I think that we need entrepreneurs more than ever. And I think if you really want to have no more Mondays, you can fill up your Saturdays and Sundays by becoming an entrepreneur the other six days of the week and 2422 that 20 hours of those days also can’t be spent as an entrepreneur but I think that now Now is the time that that the cream will rise to the top and the strong will survive, and the rest will perish. And it’s going to be sad. It’s going to be sad to watch friends and loved ones that maybe don’t make it as well through the coming times. But it’s going to be really fun to watch the ones who do make it and who we are reading books about and watching on the on the big screen and five and 10 years, and it’s gonna be interesting to see what we’re consuming in 10 years that doesn’t exist today. But tomorrow, somebody is going to launch it, we’re gonna go, dang, that’s dope. Let’s do that. So please become an entrepreneur.

Angie 

Just think about what didn’t exist 10 years ago that it exists today and take that inspiration and listen to Travis and go be an entrepreneur. Small business is still another dangerous soapbox. Small business is still the backbone of our economy here in America. And we are where innovation can happen. And I want all of you out there to be the cream that rises to the top. So there you go. Criminal Chrome, there you have it. You can have no more Mondays when you just have seven Tuesday’s really. Yeah, unwavering faith extreme effort, you never know where it will, it will take you. So there’s also some great little book recommendations in today’s episode, but in general, it is it is so exciting to see somebody who’s pushed could really push that envelope challenge to the nose, and and saw through a concept that you were really convicted by and how that has now propelled you forward. And now you’re going to do it again. How exciting. So this has been an awesome conversation. Travis, thank you so much for joining us and sharing your story and sharing some of your wisdom and soapboxes with me.

Travis 

Cheers, Angie, thank you for having me. I really appreciate it.

Angie 

This has been fantastic. We always love hearing from people who have joined the no more Mondays movement in their way. And I think that’s really important to find what you want out of life and go after it. Don’t take no for an answer. And I hope there’s some great inspiration for you from this episode in this conversation with Travis Ross buck, founder of Hydroflask and founder of maybe some teaser products coming soon. We love these kinds of stories. Travis, I appreciate you being here. And for all of those of you out there listening. We would love for you to subscribe to them on Mondays leave us a five star rating so we can continue bringing these awesome stories your way and if you want to grab the links Travis mentioned or stay in touch with him as he does potentially bring new products to market. Visit us online and no more Mondays dot info and I will see you next week for another edition of no more Monday’s podcast. Thanks for joining us for another episode of no more Mondays. Tune in next week as we bring you more insights and actions to help you improve your life and career. Don’t forget visit us online at no more Mondays dot info to get all the details shownotes and recommendation from this episode. No more Mondays we drop new episodes every Wednesday. No more Mondays is brought to you by Career Benders, Inc in partnership with executive producer Jane Durkee. For more information about career coaching, resume writing, personal branding, recruiting and entrepreneurship coaching services, visit us online at careerbenders.com